Apple files patent application to learn the sound of your voice.


Apple files another patent application: User profiling for voice input processing.

 

Apple, which recently filed a patent application for a technology to keep screens on mobile devices free of fingerprints, is upping the ante by filing for a new application that could keep you fingers from even touching the screen in the first place.

The application is for what Apple calls User Profiling for Voice Input Processing, which it describes as being able to identify your voice and understand complex commands. Need to make a playlist? No problem, just ask. Need to call your friend? Just say so. The patent application says all these commands are possible: play, call, and search. According to the application, it would allow the user to “find my most played song with a 4-star rating and create a Genius playlist using it as a seed.”

Apple’s interest in voice commands is not new. In April 2010, Apple bought Siri, a small company that created an app that let users operate their iPhone with voice commands. Apple is expected to deeply integrate voice navigation technology from Siri into the upcoming iOS 5.

CNET‘s Josh Lowensohn previously wrote that Siri’s voice technology “can listen to user voice commands to make phone calls and control music playback. Hints that Apple has been planning to improve it have been numerous, from patents to job postings.”

Apple competitors are also on the voice path. Microsoft uses speech recognition services in its Windows Phone 7 OS and Google integrated Voice Control into its Android platform.

-(via CNET)

Google leads the Voice Activated Future :


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Speech and voice recognition technology have been around for half a century, but it’s still far from mainstream. Where are the machines that write down what we say? Where are the appliances that simply work based on voice commands?

The answer is that speech technology is a tough business. Not only does a machine have to recognize words, but it has to process accents, sentence structure, grammar, language, noise and other factors that help a machine distinguish “pain” from “pane” and a television from a human being.

That’s changing, though, thanks in no small part to Google‘s efforts in developing voice recognition tech. Since 2008, Google has been steadily releasing products that turn voice into text and voice into action. It started with Google Search by Voice for Android, but most recently debuted as an alternative way to search for content on the desktop.